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CT Scan

You may have heard this area called CT Scan, CAT Scan, CT or Computerized Tomography and all are common ways to refer to what we do here. A computerized Tomography scan uses x-rays to make detailed pictures of structures inside the body.

A Computerized Tomography (CT) scan combines a series of X-ray images taken from different angles around your body and uses a computer to create cross-sectional images (slices) of the bones, blood vessels and soft tissues inside your body. CT scan images provide more detailed information than plain X-rays do. In certain cases the Radiologist may recommend that you receive a special dye called contrast material. This is something that you can be asked to drink before your CT, or something that is given through your vein in your arm or inserted into your rectum (on rare occasions) . The technologist will go through a consent with you if you are having the injection of contrast in a vein. You will be informed of the risks and the consent will need to be signed before the scan begins.

Your appointment
After your CT requisition has been faxed to the hospital and a Radiologist has protocoled it, a registration clerk will get in touch with you with your appointment date and time. They may tell you to fast for 2 hours prior to your study. If this is the case, you are still encouraged to drink clear liquids.